Cave-dwelling plants in SE Asia

cave 7-2
One of the many hundreds, if not thousands of caves located in the limestone karst of SW China. It is within such caves that we are discovering many new species of plants, very often from the nettle family.

Since 2007 I have been working with colleagues at the Chinese Academy of Sciences Guilin Institute of Botany on documenting the unusual cave flora of SW China and Guangxi. My interest stems from the fact that one of the most common groups of plants in these caves are two particular groups of nettles, members of the succulent herbaceous genera Elatostema and Pilea. It is also heavily influenced by the presence of a very knowledgeable and dedicated botanist at the Guilin Institute of Botany, Professor Wei Yi-Gang.

Cave dwelling Elatostema QMC
Examples of some of the strange looking flower clusters in the nettle genus Elatostema, the most common group of nettles to be found growing in caves

More recently I have wanted to see whether it is possible to explain how, and when these plants occupied these ancient caves. Possible explanations are that they evolved in the caves, some of which are 15-25 million years old; alternatively that they represent plants which grew outside of the caves when the climate was different, during the last ice-age for example; lastly that they are relics of plants which grew in the forest understory outside of the caves prior to the arrival of agriculture in the area maybe 1,500 years ago. To try and answer these questions I have, together with a Masters student Alfred Gay, used DNA extracted from the leaves of the plants to look for patterns which may point to one of the three possible explanations above. Click here to see a slide show of the preliminary results.

DSC_3271
A carpet of nettles growing in the back of one of the caves that we surveyed in SouthWest China, taken with a tripod!

Another interesting line of research would be how these nettles survive in such low light levels. In some cases 1/50th of 1% daylight! For the moment though I am focussing on documenting their diversity and describing the new species we find but in the long-term I am hoping to find collaborators to explore these other areas of research.

 

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